It's something most Hollywood stars can only dream of and hope for: A role that transcends film to become an iconic cultural touchstone, a role so embraced by fans that you are forever after linked with that character and that moment. If an actor is very, very lucky, they might land a role like that once in their lifetime.

Unless that star happens to be Cindy Morgan, of course. The actress brought not one, but two iconic roles to life: first as every teen boy's dream woman, Lacy Underall, in 1980's legendary comedy 'Caddyshack,' and then two years later the very different but no less revered role of Yori in the groundbreaking sci-fi adventure 'Tron.'

On the eve of this year's Comic-Con International we had the chance to sit down for a lengthy conversation with the actress to find out all the details on her upcoming book about 'Caddyshack,' what role she might be playing in 'Tron: Legacy,' and her appearance at Comic-Con. It's something most Hollywood stars can only dream of and hope for: A role that transcends film to become an iconic cultural touchstone, a role so embraced by fans that you are forever after linked with that character and that moment. If an actor is very, very lucky, they might land a role like that once in their lifetime.

Unless that star happens to be Cindy Morgan, of course. The actress brought not one, but two iconic roles to life: first as every teen boy's dream woman, Lacy Underall, in 1980's legendary comedy 'Caddyshack,' and then two years later the very different but no less revered role of Yori in the groundbreaking sci-fi adventure 'Tron.'

On the eve of this year's Comic-Con International we had the chance to sit down for a lengthy conversation with the actress to find out all the details on her upcoming book about 'Caddyshack,' what role she might be playing in 'Tron: Legacy,' and her appearance at Comic-Con.

Let's start off with the big question for Comic-Con fans: Are you going to be participating in any of the promotions for 'Tron: Legacy' this weekend?
As of this morning, Disney was gracious enough to extend an invitation to their Comic-Con party on Friday, which is the Flynn's Arcade event. Disney I think is going to be having quite a few events at Comic-Con. I understand from my friends in San Diego that banners are up around the city already. And for Disney to do something like this I think is incredibly gracious.

You also recently appeared in character as Yori for Disney's 'Tron: Legacy' promotion at WonderCon back in April.
Yes. Even though I was killed in the video game about five years ago. When people say, are you going to have any involvement in 'Tron: Legacy,' or the franchise, all I keep saying is "It's science fiction, anything's possible." And I know for a fact that they shot footage that day, so who knows what's going to happen?

So since they shot footage that day, there may be a chance Yori could make it into 'Tron: Legacy'?

I don't know how this is going to proceed. I really don't. One never knows how the story line will proceed. But the fact that Disney is being kind enough to include me in their promotion and recognize what the fans want is not just gracious, I think it's very wise. They listen. They are paying such close attention.

Considering the influence that Comic-Con has these days, it would almost seem that the studio's decision could be influenced by how fans react to your appearance at Comic-Con this weekend.
The fans absolutely are having a say. In fact, I heard it form the guys I met in the first meeting. You know, whether or not they do it for this first film, quite frankly, they may have their own thoughts. But the funny thing I am hearing is, everyone has got their own theory on how they can fit Yori into the story line. Some people say after the credits roll, to introduce the next film in the franchise. I was at an event and a little 12 year old -- the demographics for the film and for this character in the film are astonishing -- a 12- year-old little boy came up and said, "Are you in the new 'Tron?'" and I said, "Well, I really don't know." And he said, "Well, you should be, and here's what they should do. They should put Yori in the background and then put you in the credits." He's so movie savvy that he knows the setup and to put you in the credits. It's amazing how informed audiences are these days.




Did you have any idea when you working on 'Tron' and 'Caddyshack' that they would have this kind of lasting impact?
No, absolutely not. Neither film. Are you kidding? During 'Caddyshack,' I thought we were all going to be in a lot of trouble, it was 'Animal House' and we were all very badly behaved. In 'Tron' [there was a] completely different work style if I can even use those words about 'Caddyshack.'

What was that like, working on 'Tron?' The computer effects used in 'Tron' were really cutting edge for the time.
It was way ahead of its time. It took so many months in post-production because it had never been done before. And in fact, I head a story that it wasn't nominated for a category in special effects because some people considered it cheating to use a computer. Now, CGI is state of the art.

At one point, Jeff [Bridges] and Bruce [Boxleitner] and I were on this thing and the camera's following us and [director] Steven [Lisberger] said, you're looking in three different directions. And I said, of course, there's nothing here! I said, could you just have one of the gaffers grab a roll of gaffers tape and just drag it along the floor so at least we have the same eye line? And they did.

I take it filming 'Caddyshack' wasn't quite like that. I understand you're in the process of writing a book about your experiences on the set?
We would roll out of bed and I'd show up and say, "Okay, what are we doing today." And the script was virtually thrown away and you pretty much had to follow what the action was in the scene.

So what I've got is hundreds of behind the scenes photos. At first I was going to write a text-driven book, but the first book is going to be a coffee table book. Actual photos, with my commentary, of what I witnessed first hand. I mean, could you imagine being on the set of that? After six weeks of these guys ad-libbing and the parties... what went on on-camera didn't even compare to what was going on off-camera. And when I saw them after six weeks mining one of the hills on the golf course with gasoline to blow it up, I said, I'm getting so far away from this set it's not even funny and I hightailed it out of there. And they blew it up. I've got a photo of that fireball which must be three stories high. The next day, they painted it green and blew it up again. Personally, I don't recommend doing it yourself. A film like this will never be made again. It was like being struck by comedy lightning.

It was pandemonium. It was 'Animal House' on a golf course.

These days, Hollywood seems to really be pushing franchise reboots. Have you heard anything about them remaking 'Caddyshack?'
There are tons of rumors about it, but the thing about it that would be tough is, it was a perfect storm. You can't plan this kind of thing. We had brilliant improvisational actors, we had a night club act who came in like a comic juggernaut -- Rodney Dangerfield -- rolling through scenes, saying whatever the hell popped into his head;Ted Knight, who was used to being the comic, playing the straight man to Rodney and really getting angry ... at some point we all evolved into versions of our characters and things just happened. You can't plan that. I think they tried to plan it in 'Caddyshack II.' And whenever anyone asks me which 'Caddyshack' I was in, I tell them "the funny one."

Do you still keep in touch with anyone from Caddyshack?
Not as much. It's really funny, as close as we were at the time. I see Bill [Murray] once in awhile at the golf tournaments. It makes me smile, I see guys approach me and I can see them thinking, okay, I'm going to go up to Lacy Underall and I'm going to say this and as they get closer and closer they turn into the 14-year-old boy they were when they first saw the film. And it's absolutely charming. But on the back nine, after they have a couple of beers, they're reciting every line from the movie like I've never heard any of them before. And you know what? It's kind of cool. It makes me smile.

Do you do many golf tournaments? I understand you actually hosted a 'Caddyshack' reunion golf tournament for charity?
I did, four years ago, for the families of the military. I'm a big supporter of the military simply because I'm the daughter of a Polish immigrant who fled Europe during World War II from Poland and lied about his age to join the Army simply because he was proud to be an American. And who isn't? And he instilled that love for the country [in me].

So when I did this event, I got on every television station and radio station and said, look, I've got friends who are liberals and conservatives, Republicans and Democrats, and for one day, you're all going to shut up and do something nice for the families of the military. Because we want them to fight bravely and come home safely. Give them heart. We need to support these people. And nobody disagrees with that. Just very simply, my father told me how much he loves this country and how grateful he was to be here and I remember that very clearly. And we all have different opinions about whether we should be there or what we should be doing, but for those folks fighting for us, we need to honor our heroes and give them heart. They deserve it.

Cindy Morgan and Bruce Boxleitner in the 'Tron: Legacy' Encom press conference at WonderCon